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to cnnmoney.com. now, watch this. >> many here in pakistan are seeing this latest move by the obama administration as disrespectful, as the u.s. not appreciating efforts by pakistan. >> the united states sending a strong message to pakistan. do your job better or no money. now pakistan firing back with a message all of its own, that's next. plus, just when we thought this whole uk tabloid hacking scandal is over. no. no -- news today, it's about to get a whole lot worse. back in a moment. miles per gallon on the highway. how does it do that? well, to get there, a lot of complicated engineering goes into every one. like variable valve timing and turbocharging, active front grille shutters that close at high speeds, and friction reducing -- oh, man, that is complicated. how about this -- cruze eco offers 42 miles per gallon. cool? ♪ when an investment lacks discipline, it's never this obvious. introducing investment discipline etfs from russell. visit russelletfs.com r a prospectus, containing the investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses and other information. read and consid
of a former british prime minister. and pakistan's reaction to news that the united states government is cutting millions of dollars in military aid. i'll talk to the country's ambassador to the united states about the growing tension and the impact on the war on terror. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." the federal debt is soaring high or above the limit almost by the second. and president obama is vowing to hold daily negotiations to raise the ceiling if that's what it takes. another round of talks broke up just a little while ago without repeat any break through. with 22 days left the president says he won't accept the stop gap plan to prevent america from defaulting on its debts. he used a news conference this morning to challenge both parties and to lay down some markers. >> i will not sign a 30-day or a 60-day or a 90-day extension. that's just not an acceptable approach. and if we think it's going to be hard, if we think it's hard now, imagine how these guys are going to be thinking six months from now in the middle of election season when they're all up. it's n
rooms in brussels, can do about it. >> they were the worst floods in pakistan's history and a year ago today torrents of water were tearing through villages, destroying everything in their path. almost 2,000 people killed and 2 million homes destroyed. many families are still struggling with little help from the authorities. we have a report from northwest pakistan. >> the rainy season is just starting again. harmless as the water looks now, it has filled people here with dread. it is brought back the memory of images like these from last year, heaviest rains ever recorded reeked havoc across pakistan. nearly 20 million people were affected. this village was one of the first places the flood struck. people here had no warning of the disaster that was coming their way. villagers say a massive wall of water came through here from that direction and hit the village and destroyed a lot of the houses and caused a lot of deaths. in fact, a year on they still haven't found all of the bodies of those who were swept away. this woman did manage to find her two teenage daughters, but it took days
, pakistan telling america, keep your money, after the u.s. announced it's withholding $800 million in military aid. this is more evidence of the growing rift between the u.s. and pakistan. white house chief of staff william daly says it's in response to pakistan's decision to cut back on counterterrorism operations after the killing of osama bin laden. the u.s. typically gives pakistan more than $2 billion a year in security assistance. >>> u.s. joint chiefs of staff admiral -- chairman admiral mike mullen says china should no longer be described as a rising power, declaring it's a full-fledged world power hp he made the remarks at the start of a four-day visit to beijing. he called on china to become a global partner in addressing security challenges in asia and beyond. >>> jay si dugard speaking about her 18 years in captivity at the hands of philly and nancy garrido. she was 11 when kidnapped by garrido, a convicted sex offender, as she was walking to school. she talked about the long, horrifying ordeal with abc's diane sawyer. >> you would never know what she survived unless yo
and cut out. >>> the u.s. may decide to withhold millions in military aid to pakistan. this is according to a "new york times" report. the u.s. is said to be unhappy with the efforts that pakistani army has been making against the taliban as well as al qaeda. as well as $800 million in assistance could be suspended. this could cause some major problems. if pakistan takes tougher action, the aid could resume. mean while, defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan. panetta is meeting with american military leaders and afghan officials. nbc's atia abawi is in kabul this morning. bring us up to speed on what leon panetta is saying that al qaeda is basically on the run and close to being completely stamped out. >> reporter: good morning, thomas. the new secretary of defense's first trip as the defense secretary here in afghanistan, prior to arriving he talked to reporters on the plane about how he feels alg al qaeda is going right now, the war against terror. he says the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach, primarily pointing the the death of bin laden, the information they got
pakistan didn't do enough, if much avenue anything to help find usama bin laden and maybe even protected him and this morning relations between that key u.s. ally and partner in the fight against terror, is standing on even shakier ground. a report this morning in the "new york times" says the u.s. could suspend a big chunk of military aid to pakistan. and it is a lot of our money, $800 million, in security assistance. peter doocy live in washington with the details. are we looking to cut off the military of pakistan completely? >> reporter: no, but, as you said, "new york times" is reporting that we might cut $800 million out of the 2-plus billion we give pakistan in security assistance and that is because the administration does not apparently think they are being helpful in catching militant and, probably because pakistan kicked 100 of our army trainers out of the country the last few weeks and it comes very very, shortly after the strain on the u.s. relationship which was exposed following our raid on their soil to kill bin laden and earlier this week the new secretary of defense, pa
suspending $800 million in aid to pakistan's military. relations have been rocky since the u.s. navy s.e.a.l.s tracked down and killed osama bin laden at his pakistan hideout. president obama's chief of staff calls pakistan a critical but sometimes unreliable partner in the fight against terrorism. and more must be done to restore the relationship. >>> over the weekend, condolences poured in from politicians around the world paying final respects to first lady betty ford. now it's the everyday people she touched around the country who will have a chance to say good-bye. >> reporter: her candor and courage toucheded the nation. and now we know more about how betty ford's family will p p tribute. >> people in america and across the world, they are going to say good-bye and they do want to pay tribute to her. >> reporter: they will. in public and private services in california and michigan. mrs. ford, who died of natural causes friday at age 93, will first be remembered in a private service tuesday in palm desert, california, near where she and president ford lived after the whi
$800 million in aid to pakistan's military. the u.s. is trying to pressure pakistan to crack down on militants. meanwhile, a suicide bomber struck at a rally, six people were killed there, another 15 wounded. an explosion at a naval base in cyprus when munitions on a cargo ship caught fire. the blast was so huge, it knocked out power to the nation's largest electricity plant, which is right near that base. >>> conservative christian group has retracted a controversial package about slavery from its marriage pledge but not before two presidential candidates actually signed on to it. deputy political director paul steinhauser has the rest of the story here, read iing between t lines. >> a lot of of people talking about this story, iowa, first caucus state. family leader, one of the top social conservative groups in iowa. very, very important, constituents in iowa. and we're talking about traditional marriage, a pledge for the candidates to sign, to promote fidelity with your spouse and promote traditional marriage, not same-sex marriage. the preamble says slavery had a disastrous im
to pakistan. >> right now, they've taken some steps that have given us reason to pause on some of the aid which we were giving to their military. >> and new tensions since the killing of usama bin laden as we keep 800 million dollars in our american pockets. and. and.... >> making america proud on the global stage. the u.s. soccer team triumphs over brazil at the women's world cup with a come from behind win. tonight, the thrilling action that propelled the red, white and blue to the semifinals. first, leon panetta making his first visit to iraq as the new u.s. secretary of defense. touching down in baghdad, after leaving afghanistan, we told you, forecast end could be near for al-qaeda and push iraqi leaders for the american forces in their country and the u.s. scheduled to withdraw all of the 46,000 troops by the end of the year, but ongoing security concerns now prompting new talk of keeping some u.s. experts in place. the highest ranking officer, mike mullen on a four day visit to china, voicing serious new concerns that disputes between china and neighbors may spark unforeseen confli
pakistan at this point. most of the terrorist attacks that take place in india, at least in this region of india, are traced back to pakistani groups or pakistani-sponsored group and one group coming to mash lashkare tayyiba. they have been traced back to pakistani militant groups. this is not particularly happening at a great time. you're seeing a lot of attention right now between the u.s. and pakistan, and if it's traced back to the same groups, that tension will only increase in a couple of days. >> i just learned from our producers, the associated press confirming 21 people dead as a result of the terror attacks. as i mentioned, president obama has condemned these attacks, and you brought up the key issue, responsibility, and if there's any links to pakistan at this very questionable time when we look at the relationship between the united states and pakistan, even including the removal or no longer giving pakistan that $800 million in aid. >> yeah. let's not forget, i mean, there are allegations out there, including allegations mounted by all three things the u.s. justice departme
, in pakistan rather. >> today we honor a singular act of gallantry. as we near the 10th anniversary of the attacks thrust our nation into war, it is the occasion to pay tribute to a soldier and a generation that has borne the burden of our security during a hard decade of sacrifice. i want to take you back to the circumstances that led to this day. it is may 26, 2008. in the remote eastern afghanistan, near the mountainous border of pakistan. helicopters carrying dozens of a lead army rangers race over the rugged landscape. and their target is an insurgent, down. the mission is high risk. it is broad daylight. the insurgents are heavily armed. but it is considered a risk worth taking because intelligence indicates that a top al qaeda commander is in that compound. soon the helicopters touched down, and our rangers immediately come under fire. within minutes, leroy -- then a staff sergeant -- and another soldier are pushing ahead into a courtyard surrounded by high mud walls. that is when the enemy opens up with their a k-47's. leroy is hit in both legs. he's bleeding badly. but he s
crying, it's going to be okay. martha: well, tension is mounting in pakistan. the united states has announced that it will withhold millions in military aid there. so the pakistani government sources unfazed by this apparent snub, but some diplomats are calling it, quote, an unwise move on the part of the united states. many experts now worry what this will mean for the already very stormy relationship between the united states and pakistan, especially in light of the bin laden capture and kill. conor powell joins me live from islamabad with the latest on that. hi, connor. >> reporter: well, hi, martha. well, to describe the afghan -- or the american/pakistan relationship as stormy is massively becoming a real understatement. it is down right poisonous and hostile at times now. for the last ten years or so, the united states has given about $20 billion to pakistan's military for the larger war on terror. this year alone they were meant to give $2 billion. but over the weekend the white house announced that it's withholding $800 million to the pakistani military. now, officially, the
$800 million in military aid to pakistan. that's about a third of the yearly total. the move is aimed at getting pakistan to do more in the battle against extremists. >>> there's news about a brutal war closer to home tonight. just when it comes mexico's deadly drug war can't get any worse, there was a vicious new wave of violence this weekend not far from the u.s. border. nbc's kevin tibbles has the latest. >> reporter: it has been a weekend of carnage in mexico as vicious fighting between notorious drug cartels has left some 40 people dead. in one grizzly attack, gunmen wielding ak-47 automatic weapons opened fire in a crowded bar where police allege drugs were being sold. 21 people killed when the bar was sprayed with bullets. more than 500 miles away, 11 more bodies shot with high-powered rifles were found in a pile near a water well. in an area terrorized by a gang known as the knight's templars. some victims were blindfolded with their hands bound. the attacks occurred in three places. the nor they shall economic center of monterey also on the outskirts of mexico city, the count
is withholding $800 million of military -- military -- military aid to pakistan. this comes after the response to the u.s. raid that killed osama bin laden. the united states wants to pressure pakistan to aggressively pursue the taliban. that $800 million figure is a little more than the third than the more than $2 billion gives pakistan in security aid every year. >>> a new york state judge has thrown out a lawsuit attempting to stop an islamic community sent near the world trade center site. the judge says the former new york city firefighter who filed the lawsuit he has no -- says he has no merit. >>> starting today, you can make free online reservations to take a tour of the 9/11 memorial in new york city. the memorial will be dedicated september 11th. the 10th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the world trade center. it will open to the public the following day. that museum is skeled 20 open on the 11th -- scheduled to open on the 11th anniversary of the attacks. >>> coast guard rescued 15 illegal immigrants off a santa cruz island, which is one of the channel islands off the coast
and seven years of attacks on the hideouts in pakistan has significantly weakened al qaeda. and the view is that the offshoot in yemen is a bigger threat than the group's traditional bags along the pakistan -- base along the pakistan/afghanistan border. >>> love from fremont an oak -- law enforcement from fremont an oak land raided a home at 98th avenue to carry out a search warrant. no details on who or what they were looking for at this point. >>> the requirement to post calorie count on menus is having an effect on people's eating habits. one in six people are noticing the information and buying foods with fewer calories. it was gathered by tracking thousands of fast food customers in new york. the first study to show a change in people's eating habits since the law went into effect in 2008. in california, the same law started in january. >>> 6:19. let's check in with sal. you're watching the roads and the bridges too. >>> we're looking at all of it we're looking with our good eye on highway 4 coming up to the willow pass. it looks good and you can see for yourself if you don't trust
adviser when he says we need to cresco verdict action in pakistan? >> i think what's clear, pakistanis not doing everything they can to crack down on al qaeda. they have certain limitations they can't live up to. but for whatever reason, they are not doing everything they can. and what the raid that killed bin laden proved, there are things the u.s. can do, perhaps without the consent of the pakistani government that can accelerate the process, this is brought up by dennis blair the other day. drone strikes, violations of sovereignty. are we creating more problems than we solve? are we threatening diplomatic relationships with key relationships with pakistan and yemen without consulting the governments. >> given you say it's become amorphed into an ideological princip principle, does that mean we can never stamp it out entirely? >> i won't say ever, but they have their own leadership structures in each country. even if we get rid of al qaeda in afghanistan or pakistan, we won't simply wipe it out in every country this is an organization that will be with us for decades, one way or anot
, which is also the problem of pakistan, becomes a regional problem in which the country's in the region have a stake in solving and are not -- there's a reasonable chance that can be pulled off. >> dr. brzezinski, you mentioned pakistan. the focus of policy leaders. turning away from afghanistan, we got reports the journalist who was killed by the isi inside pakistan further out is complicating our relationship with that group. we announced going in to kill osama bin laden. how do we manage this relationship that's been difficult to manage for as far as the eye can see? >> well, first of all, we have to recognize we are dealing here with two sifrl conflicts. one in afghanistan and the one in pakistan. there's a conflict in pakistan. there isn't a foreign intervention trying to resolve it. it is a great internal conflict. what we are seeing in pakistan is a series of contradictory policies, contradictory engagements and contradictory engagements. the army wants to preserve a stable pakistan that is assured of security and sees the united states as a component of the success in that quest
of pakistan that will bring success to local areas. a country from kabul, it will never happen. we are wasting time and money. the fact we are leaving may assist in the development of stability in local areas. they will never be a centrally governed pakistan, i mean afghanistan. afghanistan is not like iraq. give me one more second and i'll tell you what i think is going to happen in iraq. we'll probably go back to having one bloodthirsty tyrant to rule the country. that's the irony of iraq. >> happy days, wes. >> afghanistan is extraordinarily tribal. it's difficult to have a conversation about afghanistan. one story i loved was one of the things we did in afghanistan when i was working with the civil affairs team, giving out flags to children and local leaders. they would look at the flag and say what is this. you would have to explain, it's your country. there's another thing, i think you brought up a good point, joe. afghanistan is not iraq. you are right. there's a crucial player, though that factors in. that's iran. iran is not only very active and involved, but in addition to that, iran
in military aid to pakistan, about one-third the annual total according to administration officials. relations between the two countries have been strained especially after the u.s. raid that kill add bin laden. only a short distance from pakistan's leading military academy. the might of those trying to survive the drought hit horn of africa is far outstripping the ability of anyone to help. u.n.'s chief refugee official said today the crisis in somalia alone is the worst humanitarian disaster in the world. to give an idea of the scale he was visiting a refugee camp the size of cleveland. tony guida has more. >> reporter: look into this child's eyes. he knows something you and i will never know, how it feels to be desperately hungry. there are many children like him in this hospital in mogadishu, malnourished children, some close to death, all refugees from the drought and violence destroying somalia. >> if you are a hungry person, somebody once told me it feels as if there is bleach in your belly. it hurts so much. >> bettina luescher speaks for the world food program, the oortion will feed 6
in pakistan. >> dave: they believe the head of al-qaeda is in pakistan al sar zawahiri. they said they're not happy with their actions and-- >> they're ratting us out when we go to the leaders. >> dave: they've kicked out military trainers. >> mike: it's hard to give money to people, maybe a segment of the pakistan military was harboring osama bin laden for goodness sake. >> ainsley: time for the headlines. two tennessee national guard members are dead after their helicopter goes down. the chopper crashed during a routine training flight. the chopper hit power lines on the way down, knocking out power to thousands of residents there as well. no word yet on the cause. the pilots were in an oh-58-d kiowa helicopter the subject of a lawsuit allegedly, alleging a faulty control system and fighter jets intercept two civilian planes near camp david where president obama is staying. it happened at separate times. both planes were escorted to nearby airports and they say the first plane had been out of radio communication. no word why the cessna got so close. the third time this month that pla
as well. pat. >> dr. brzezinski, let me talk to you about pakistan. powers flu out, richard nixon tilted, doctor brzezinski was over there looking down the pass. they were a great ally in the cold war. now it looks like we have lost pakistan. have we lost pakistan? if so, why and was it inevitable. >> i think we are losing pakistan. i don't know if we have lost it yet. if we disengage intelligently and engage in the umbrella i have been talking about, her happens we will lose it all together. i think the fault is two way. first of all, we have never been really consistently and comprehensively sensitive to the political interests in having a secure backyard in afghanistan. we just haven't. resently, we played with indi s indians. we give a super nuclear deal to the indians. we did not give it to the pakistanis. there's resentment there. pakistan is coming undone on its own. it's not all our undoing. there's a conflict between the army and society at large. divisions between the army and the military and intelligence. ethnic differences. regional differences in pakistan. plus, this overw
the remaining leaders. >> somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders that between pakistan, yemen, somalia, aqim and north africa, those are -- if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the new al-qaeda chief continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he said he believes the al-qaeda leader may well be just over the border in pakistan's northwestern tribal areas. and general petraeus, who leaves his post here this month to head the c.i.a., also said today, al-qaeda was on the run, in his opinion. enormous damage is being done to the al-qaeda network over the border in pakistan. back to you. >> rick: david piper on the phone from kabul for us. thanks for the update. >> rick: getting the royal treatment, a polo club in california hosting a future king, prince william is taking part in a charity polo match right now and his new bride, the duchess of cambridge is on hand cheering him on. the royal couple mingling with hollywood royalty on their trip to the u.s. casey stegall live in santa barbara. who is a
. pakistan? where would you focus your attention? >> pakistan's an important challenge. there's not much we can do about it. we've tried all sorts of things there and nothing seems to work. i would say revitalizing our relationships in asia and the pacific. that's where history the going to be written in the 21st surgeriry. i would say involved there. better relations with ind ka ya with the countries of southeast asia. doing something about our energy situation that we're less vulnerable on vagaries of price and supply that would go a long way. again, i'd focus more at home on competitiveness, on improving our immigration policy. on the quality of our schools. on the quality of our transportation infrastructure and so forth. again, we have got to retore the foundations of american power. that's a prerequisite if we're going to lead in the world either by what we do or our example. >> restoration is the theme. i hope it's the subject of the next book. thanks so much for joining us. >> thanks, andrea. >> it's very provocative richard. >>> a word of warning the images you're about to see is h
for pakistan. 62-year-old is a u.s. sit gland lives in fairfax, virginia. prosecutors say he worked as an unregistered agent for pakistan's spy agency, trying to influence congress, the white house and the state department toward favoring pro pakistani policy. federal agents arrested him a week ago. >>> 9news now has learned harry thomas met with his legal team on monday and there have been discussions on how thomas should respond to mounting calls for his resignation. kwame brown issued a statement that shopped just short of asking thomas to step down. last week, without admitting wrongdoing, thomas agreed to repay $300,000 that the d.c. attorney general says thomas converted to personal use. those taxpayer and charitable dollars were intended for youth baseball programs. >>> it is time for another "your money" report. >> jessica is back. >> don't sound so upset. >> every time she talks airlines, i wristel a little bit. >> let's say uncle sam says to you you don't have to pay your taxes. you get a pass from the i.r.s. that would be nice. that's exactly what's happening to the airli
pakistan's minister for minorities condemned the blasphemy law, militants executed him in broad daylight. in egypt, as the gentleman from new jersey has stated, 23 men, women and children were killed in a bombing at an alexandria church in egypt on new year's eve, just last may, treekists attacked christians at a church in cairo, leaving 12 dead and hundreds wounded. we are fortunate -- i wish these were isolated cases but i could provide countless other examples from afghanistan to india to saudi arabia. we're fortunate to live in a country that was founded by religious refugees on principles of tolerance. but it is important that we do everything we can to ensure that religious minorities elsewhere in the world enjoy the freedoms and protections they deserve, the freedoms and protections enjoyed by all americans, appointing this special envoy will be an important step in that direction and i urge my colleagues to support this bill. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. smith: i yield such time
is occurring in yemen? >> pakistan is probably larger than any of them. afghanistan is a distraction. one thing about afghanistan, when you had the attacks on the hotel, it went back to vietnam. it's a reminder the people we are working with in afghanistan, given what they get out of pakistan, they will not be able to turn the corner. we continue to invest enormously there. >> howard dean? >> afghanistan, because of the leadership there, no matter what we do, it doesn't matter. karzai is hopeless. i'm more optimistic. if you look at it over many, many years, tunisia is a bright star. egypt is not going to be a democracy in the way we know it. yemen is a huge problem. libya, who knows. i think there's progress that's been made here. i agree there's a lot of countries not making progress. syria, who knows what's going to happen. there will be real gains. >> i kind of agree with governor dean. in yemen, if we have what you describe, the potential for ungovernable state, it will become a petri dish of groups. they may be highly dysfunctional, but not failed. how does the u.s. not send some kind of
the east to the pakistan border. that's where i spent my time. we're starting to see a lot of the flow from fighters coming from pakistan. >> let me ask you, drawn down 33,000 troops by september of next year, good shape in kandahar and helmand province. how can you maintain momentum and win a war when you're pulling out 1/3 of the best soldiers you've got. >> a couple of things, one, we're having as we had with a bond conference in 2001. what's interesting is as we were talking about troop deployments and actual mission and strategy, we're in the process of escalating the troop numbers. now we're having the reconciliation with the taliban and networks, etc., as we're decelerating. that factors in to the larger conversation. the second thing that's important to remember about the troop assignments is how many will be combat troops or support troops. what are the areas you're going to pen trade in to and hold on to the areas as well. >> "the new york times" reporting this morning that the obama administration officials believe that pakistan's spy agency ordered the killing of a pakistani jou
pakistan, as we said on the show a number of times. how do we deal with pakistan and at the same time, get out of afghanistan except in terms of special forces or drones to represent our interest and chase down terrorists? meanwhile, you have the greatest tender box in the world, to save a nuclear pakistan with more than 100, probably twice as many with nuclear warheads that can fall into the hands of terrorists. >> the bottom line is, how do we deal with it? >> it's always pakistan is a basket case, a nuclear basket case. stay in afghanistan. >> you don't. you don't. >> it's not going to work. that is washington's argument, mike barnicle. pakistan is stabilized. we have to keep having american troops killed in afghanistan. it doesn't add up. invading cambodia is the right move when you are going into vietnam. >> continuing argument and keep making it because less than 1% of american families and american people are serving in the military in afghanistan. >> there you go. >> back to the draft. >> untouched. >> we need a draft. >> we'll come back the dr. aidan quinn. [ male announcer ] memb
after the entire terrorist infrastructure inside of pakistan. >>dave: are we taking our eye off the ball? all we hear about is al qaeda? panetta and general petraeus saying we close to finishing them off. is that a public perception? >>guest: i'm concerned by the fact they do recite that there is a war on al qaeda and there are other groups like the indian mujaheddin who is in the to be a front for l.e.t. which operates openly in pakistan. a vast array of groups with the same ideology of al qaeda and we have to go after them just as much. >>dave: what role did pakistani play in this and are they our friend or foe? >>guest: the l.e.t. operate a huge infrastructure in magazine stage and bragged they have 200 facilities operating in pakistan and they have charity schools and pakistan does nothing about it. >>dave: and the funding of the military, we have cut off the military funding. is pakistan saying you need to start the money flowing again here? or we will in the help you? >>guest: that is the direction they are moving. i expect a rise in the attacks in afghanistan or to bring that mess
airport. they say pakistan, thailand, kenya, they aren't good at sharing information. even when they have terrorist screening information they may not hav bill: they only have to be right once. peter doocy there. that hearing starts in 25 minutes. we'll monitor it, bring you updates won that starts. if you are near a computer you can watch it streaming live at foxnews.com. click on theling next to the home page. we try and make it easy for you. all the analysts we talk to, they only have to be trite once. we have to be right every single time. alisyn: the top republican in the house calling president obama out for what he called making a veiled threat. the president said he cannot guarantee the social security checks will go out august 3 if there is no deal to raise the debt ceiling by august 2. >> we don't want this to happen. we don't want stoag security recipients to wait a day any longer for their checks. but it really stroiks the importance of what it is we are doing. we made promises to ourselves and kids and grandkids can't afford. i said all year, i think this is the moment and th
insurgents in pakistan and it shows more than a dozen men believed to be pakistani policemen lined up. there they are, against the backdrop of the hillside with their hands tied behind their backs facing several men with rifles on the right side of your screen. this man shouting is accusing them of killing children in a crime against islam. and there they are, the men opening fire. now we froze the video right there because if you continue to watch, it gets even more graphic, even more brutal from that point on. c nrks nr cnn's reza sayah is taking up from here. >> reporter: we warn you, this is explicit video, some of you may find this very disturbing, if you want to turn away, this is a good time to do so. we want to walk you through the video, it shows at least 14 men lined up, all of them wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them appear to have their hands tied behind their back. we assume these are taliban fighters, one of them is scolding the man who are lined up, saying that these executions are about to take place in revenge for six children allegedly executed by pakista
the truth is that al-qaida's hierarchy in afghanistan and pakistan that he's referring to has been severely weakened. we've seen several al-qaida leaders killed over the past ewu months and years. to say al-qaida's hierarchy has been weakened and could possibly be defeated is true. but al-qaida has shifted to yemen, to somalia and also the al-qaida movement. it's become such a global galvanizing movement, brian. you have self-starters here in america, in england who are acting on their own with no direct link to al-qaida so you can defeat al-qaida, yes, but the movement that al-qaida has sparked, the ideology is the real problem here and brian, real quick, this administration when they talk about the war on terror, the war against radical islam, they have tunnel vision! al-qaida is only one element of a much broader enemy, iran, hezbollah and the muslim brotherhood which this administration wants to reach out to. >> which is a little crazy. tell us about this bomb throw, we'll talk about this a little bit later as well. tell about the next move is sewing these explosive devices into people'
that occurred originally back in the '40s between india and pakistan, a couple hundred muslims live inside -- >> millions. that's okay. >> live inside india and there are extremist groups with india as opposed to pakistani base that go over to india responsible for similar small-scale attacks. so nobody is clear yet who it is, but i think you're right. the fact that indian officials didn't immediately blame or cast doubt that it was pakistan suggests that they don't think it is. >> and also you just made a point we were talking ak. 200 million muslims in country of india makes india one of the largest -- the largest muslim country in the world? >> exactly. indonesia and india, countries with the largest number of muslims in the world. indians often present that evidence to westerners. >> sure. >> saying we know how to work closely with our multiple populations. we're a large democracy and see how things go so well. it doesn't always go so well in that country. >> move to syria. both in new york and washington we're obsess with the debt talks and defaulting and obviously for important reaso
in iraq after the withdrawal deadline in december. officials in pakistan today played down a u.s. decision to suspend $800 million in military aid. u.s. officials confirmed it on sunday. but, a pakistani spokesman insisted today that operations would continue without external support. tensions between the two nations have escalated since the u.s. raid that killed osama bin laden inside pakistan. reports in britain now say former prime minister gordon brown was one of the victims of phone hacking by a tabloid newspaper "news of the world". the rupert murdoch media conglomerate has closed the paper. and it delayed efforts today to take over another company, british sky broadcasting or, b- sky-b. we have a report from gary gibbon of "independent television news." >> reporter: gordon brown wooed the murdoch empire like the best of them. but they turned on him, backing david cameron in the last election. today, he turned on them. gordon brown believes his phone and that of his wife may have been hacked into by the "news of the world." he believes someone working on behalf of the "sunday times"
on the side of safety. host: unless the administration certifies that pakistan is making progress in fighting terrorism, this is what howard berman of california has to say -- guest: i agree with that premise. we need to keep pressure on pakistan to make absolutely sure that no part of their government supports radical organizations like the taliban are al qaeda. we have to remember that they are alert -- they are nuclear power. we do not want radical elements in getting control all those weapons. in addition, pakistan is a conduit to get weapons in to fight the taliban. it is a thorny issue in the one that we have to work out. to cut up pakistan immediately would be a mistake. host: greg, independent line. caller: as long as the budget is an issue, eliminate the patriots back, homeland security, the police. fire those people. fire them right now. get the money from there. no one was concerned about the budget when bush was fighting a war on two fronts. i was in the national guard and the marines. i did not go the last three times because my son came back. the national guard, it is a good thi
of the key leadership within al-qaeda, both in pakistan as well as in yemen. >> panetta is also meeting with american troops. president obama wants to bring about 10,000 service members back home this year, and 20,000 next year. >>> a strong earthquake in japan prompted a brief tsunami warning today. a magnitude 7.3 quake shook the northeast coast, the same area devastated by the march earthquake and tsunami. residents received orders to evacuate this morning, but the tsunami order was lifted after several hours. >>> house speaker john boehner is abandoning plans to pursue a massive $4 trillion deficit reduction package. speaker boehner says a smaller agreement is more realistic. >> both men agree, it's going to hurt. but where to find that money? that's where the two camps divide. republicans don't want tax increases. democrats want to keep entitlements like medicare, and social security in tact. so far, no one is budging. the two sides will meet in the white house again sunday inside. >> we agree on some of the big thingsment we agree after a decade of racking up deficits and debt, we
bin laden, we've now identified some of the key leadership within al-qaeda, both in pakistan, as well as in yemen and other areas. that if we can be successful at going after them, i think we can really undermine their ability. heather: all right. well, you heard it there. are we really that close to wiping out al-qaeda? let's ask peter brooks, a senior fellow for national security affairs at the hurtarg foundation and a former cia officer, he joins us live from washington. good morning peter. >> good morning, heather. heather: what do you think about that assessment, do you agree with it? >> i certainly hope he's right. i'm not sure what he's basing it on. i think what they've done here is they believe they're on the verge of strategically de feeding al-qaeda because they've gotten rid of bin laden, they have to get rid of zawahiri and they have ten, 20 other leaders they believe they will be able to target in pakistan, somalia, the other country he didn't mention, so i hope he knows something i don't know but what i worry about, this may have two backdrops to it. one, it could make
and fighters to the bases in pakistan and afghanistan. let's get to part of what the "wall street journal" said. the quote reads they outlined what they said was a fund-raising operation that uses iran-based operatives and draws from donors in persian gulf companies. the treasury said they sanctioned six for allegedly overseeing this network. >> how concerned are you when you hear this report and what does this mean? >> it's difficult to understand at first. you look at what happens and you see militias confronting al qaeda and a lot of people die. it's difficult to imagine the allies. what's amazing is there has been evidence and through other sources that does tend to confirm the fact that iran is a major location from money laundering and cross transit into afghanistan. it is operating as a portal for the taliban and al qaeda. why is iran doing this? probably not for idea logical reasons. they wanted to reach a deal and ever since then they have been holding this issue. there have been high ranking members that are allowed to live in iran. the question is what games do they want to play? >>
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